May #52books2017

27. Maz Evans – Who Let the Gods Out?

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Elliot is suffering – he has problems at school, his mum’s health is a worry, and between them they are struggling to make ends meet. Added to this is the sudden appearance of Virgo, an immortal. She takes Elliot on a whirlwind adventure to save them both – it is full of jokes, smart historical references and an all-action endeavour which races by. The humour is aimed at the book’s audience but there are lots of nods and winks to adults as well, while the caricature Greek gods add lots of hilarity to the tale.

28. Kiran Millwood Hargrave – The Island at the End of Everything

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This should easily a contender for book of the year – it is simply magical. Set on Culion Island in the Phillipines, we are introduced to Ami. Her mother is afflicted with leprosy and, led by the fantastically venomous Mr Zamora, will soon be separated from Ami as Culion is turned into a colony for those who are ‘Touched’.

The story follows Ami’s separation, her struggles in her new home and her plans to return to Culion. You may need to sit down with a box of tissues when you read the ending.

This is a book of hope, of love and of relationships, reminding us that there is good in people. The language used is full of poetic lilt and imagery, and would be a brilliant class read.

29. Christopher Edge – The Many Worlds of Albie Bright

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Albie’s mum passed away recently, so now it is just him and his Dad, a famous scientist. Intrigued by the idea of parallel universes, Albie sets up his own experiment which takes him to lands of alternate existences, a glimpse into what could have been. Another story with a choker of an ending, but a really quick pace and good humour too.

30. M.G. Leonard – Beetle Boy

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I read this with my class and they have absolutely loved it. They were fascinated by the beetles – we kept putting images of different types on our board – but the story itself had them well hooked from the word go. They laughed at Humphrey and Pickering, did that awkward laugh/glance at their friends when Novak met Darkus, and drew great big gasps of breath at Lucretia Cutter’s evil ways.

They have voted to read the sequel – I am pleased about this!

31. Zana Fraillon – The Bone Sparrow

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This was tough, but brilliant and engaging. Subhi lives in a detention camp – I was imagining something like the Calais jungle – where he dreams of the outside, of a better life. This is tantalisingly close when he meets Jimmie, a girl from outside who has found her way in, and befriends Subhi when she learns he can read. The story tells us how Subhi survives, mainly thanks to his sister Queeny and his friend Eli, but he holds on to the hope that his father will come and find him and his family soon.

The ending was really hard to read and process, and the afterword brings it all home that this situation is based on the ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya people of Burma, and that people of all backgrounds and ages are treated like this in 2017.

32. Katherine Rundell – The Wolf Wilder

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Marina and Feo, mother and daughter, look after wolves. They teach them how to be wild again, having been the toy-pets of the wealthy. General Rakov doesn’t trust these so-called witches, and hunts them down, taking Marina away and leaving Feo to escape, promising vengeance.

Feo is a wonderful character, full of bravery and determination and self-doubt, and is supported ably by Ilya, a boy soldier who quickly falls in love with Feo’s wolves. The two of them grow as a partnership, learning to trust each other and eventually, to trust others, as they embark on a journey for what is right.

33. Lara Williamson – Just Call Me Spaghetti-Hoop Boy

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Adam Butters is an adopted boy who yearns to find out why his birth mother gave him up. The story centres on his difficult journey to do just this, but is written with lots of light-hearted moments.

Lara Williamson writes from a child’s point of view brilliantly – the misplaced confidence, the friendships, the secret plans – and has a wonderful way of drawing everything together at the end. The final few chapters, particularly Adam’s conversation with his adoptive mum, are really well-thought out and touching.

34. Jo Cotterill – A Library of Lemons

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The first book for a long time that I managed to read in a day, simply because it’s that good.

Calypso lives with her dad. Since her mum’s death, she has preferred her own company, taking to reading books rather than making friends. Her father is doing the same, immersing himself in his own work rather than his daughter.

This begins to unravel when Mae starts at Calypso’s school and the two bond over stories. They form a strong friendship, one which opens Calypso’s eyes to what she has been missing in her own home.

A book about friendship, grief and inner strength, and an uplifting read.

35. Neil Gaiman – The Ocean at the End of the Lane

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Another magical, mystical tour through the mind of Neil Gaiman. Here the narrator reflects on events that happened to him when he was seven, involving the Hempstock family, who seem to have lived forever; Ursula Monkton, a tormenting, ever-present other-wordly figure who appears as a nanny, a worm and a piece of fabric; and the miner, whose suicide precipitates a chain of events so bizarre, so mesmerising and so unreal-ly real that it will stay with me for a long time.

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