Developing a love of reading

Aidan Chambers’ book ‘The Reading Environment’ talks of ‘The Reading Circle’. Here’s how I’ve tried to develop this in the classroom, hopefully encouraging a class of readers at the same time.

The Reading Circle, from Aidan Chambers’ book ‘The Reading Environment’ (1996)

Selection

Know your books (bookstock and availability)

I’ve been buying lots of books over the last seven/eight months and have read lots of blogs written by teachers and book reviewers in order to try and develop a wider knowledge of suitable books for my year 6 children. While I’ve always loved and promoted books like Skellig, Wonder and Holes, I wanted my children to become familiar with a wider range of authors, which is what they’re currently doing.

They now know about newer authors like Polly Ho-Yen, Lara Williamson, Peter Bunzl, Lisa Thompson and Kiran Millwood Hargrave. They are learning about more established authors such as Elizabeth Laird, David Almond and Kate DiCamillo. They are out at the weekend buying or borrowing books, then rushing in to tell their friends, or me. This is probably the best feeling there is as a teacher – to know you have influenced or encouraged them to pick up and buy a book.

And to do this, I have needed to show that I am enthusiastic, knowledgeable and interested. People like Simon Smith, Rhoda Wilson, Ashley Booth and Mathew Tobin have helped enormously with this as they regularly engage in book-talk, sharing recommendations, ideas and enthusiasm online.

Share books (accessibility)

I know lots of teachers do this, but I also know that lots of teachers wouldn’t ever want to – I think it is important. My class borrow books from me all the time, and through word of mouth certain books are seldom on my bookshelf. That’s what I want.

Whenever I finish a book, I share my review with the children and put it on my lending shelf. By the end of the day it has usually gone.

My personal bookshelf, which children go to and borrow from regularly

We have now opened our junior library at school so hopefully the children will have a greater range of books to choose from.

Response

Engage with authors (formal talk and book gossip)

There are so many ways to get in touch with authors these days that it would seem silly not to. Twitter is the most obvious route, with authors keen to hear from their readers and able to give quick replies. Lara Williamson contacted the class via Twitter then sent them a personalised email; M.G. Leonard responded to a tweet by leaving a lovely comment on our blog; and Frank Cottrell Boyce sent us a letter that included a fake £20 note from the set of Millions. 

These authors didn’t need to take the time to reply to our class but the fact that they did really engaged the children – here were real-life authors talking to us, thanking us and asking us questions.  This is such an easy thing for a teacher to do and the children’s reactions are priceless.

Discuss (book gossip)

It sounds obvious, but talking to the children about the books they are reading has such a massive impact. Whenever I see them reading, or with a book, I ask them what it is, how they’re finding it, whether they’d recommend it etc. They’re probably sick of me doing so, but they are doing it themselves now – sharing recommendations, asking to borrow each other’s books and even telling me when a particular author has a new book out.

Reading

Read together (time to read)

Linked to the point above, because of their confidence in reading, the children love to read together. When we have reading time, either at the start of the day or when it is timetabled, some children choose to read silently on their own, some read with a partner (almost acting the stories out), and other children listen to one of their peers read parts of their books to them. Seeing the children involved in their books is a powerful and rewarding thing. 

Read aloud (hearing it done and doing it for yourself)

As a class, we’ve read 6 books this year, which doesn’t sound many but isn’t bad going considering we have had SATs to prepare for and a squeezed timetable at the best of times. We read every day – the children voice some of the characters, and they create accents and personalities for the characters we come across. The children are involved. As Chambers suggests, they are hearing it done, doing it for themselves and having time to read.

There were two reading-related articles in the Guardian this weekend, both of which surmised that stories are being devalued and almost forgotten in our current education system.

The Secret Teacher

Ditch the grammar and teach storytelling instead

Reading is a wonderful thing to share with a class, and it should be promoted by a teacher as often as possible. Chambers’ Reading Circle is a simple, straightforward model to follow and has helped my class to develop as readers, hopefully for a much longer time than I’ll be teaching them.

Advertisements

Tagged:

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: